It has been a busy time for those working in payroll, so we have compiled a useful guide for tax deadlines dates in Ireland and the UK this July.

HMRC (UK) 

17th July 2020

Deadline date for payment of PAYE Tax and National Insurance to HMRC Accounts Office by non-electronic method for month 3.

22nd July 2020

Deadline date for payment of PAYE Tax and National Insurance to HMRC Accounts Office by electronic method for month.

Revenue (Ireland)

July 14th 2020

PAYE/Pay Related Social Insurance (PRSI)/Universal Social Charge (USC)/Local Property Tax (LPT):   Monthly return and payment for June 2020 (payment date is extended to 23rd for ROS users who file and pay online).

Quarterly return and payment for April – June 2020 (23rd for ROS users who file and pay online).

Dividend Withholding Tax (DWT): Return and payment of DWT for June 2020.

Professional Services Withholding Tax (PSWT): F30 monthly return and payment for June 2020

July 19th 2020

Value-Added Tax (VAT):  Monthly VAT 3 return and payment (if due) for the period June together with a Return of Trading Details where the VAT accounting period ends in June.

VAT: Bi-Monthly VAT 3 return and payment (if due) for period May – June 2020 together with the Return of Trading Details where the accounting period ends between 1 May and 30 June.

VAT: Bi-Annual VAT 3 return and payment (if due) for period January – June 2020 together with the Return of Trading Details where the accounting period ends between 1 January and 30 June.

VAT: Annual VAT 3 return and payment (if due) for the period July – June together with a Return of Trading Details where the VAT accounting period ends in June.

July 20th 2020

VAT: MOSS VAT return and payment (if due) for the period April – June 2020.

July 1st -23rd 2020

Corporation Tax: PT for APs ending between 1-31 August 2020.

Corporation Tax: Returns for APs ending between 1-31 October 2019.

Corporation Tax: Pay balance due on APs ending between 1-31 October 2019.

July 23rd 2020

Relevant Contracts Tax (RCT): RCT monthly return and payment (if due) for June 2020.

RCT: RCT quarterly return and payment (if due) for period April – June 2020.

July 1st -31st  2020

Corporation Tax: Returns of Third Party Information for APs ending between 1-31 October 2019.

All information on dates is sourced directly from Revenue Ireland’s and HRMC’s websites and published by Intelligo for informative purposes only. For more details or with any queries on these dates, please contact these bodies directly.

It’s general knowledge that, as an employer, supporting employees to reach their goals is critical to your business. This is now more important than ever, even in the light of the current COVID-19 pandemic. After all, employees achieving goals and working hard affects the flow and bottom line of your business, so goal-setting is particularly essential as a mechanism for this. However, plans can be easily waylaid if not given the proper guidance, especially is your employees are working remotely. So, how actively engaged should you be in helping employees set and accomplish their goals? The crucial step is to be hands-on while giving your employees the space they need to succeed in their initiative. Here are some examples to follow as you navigate how to best assist your people in reaching their goals.

Connect Goals

For goals to be meaningful and useful in driving employees forward, they must be tied to larger company goals. Employees who don’t understand the roles they play in the company’s progress are more likely to become disengaged. No matter what level the employee is at, they should be able to verbalise exactly how their work feeds into the broader company plan. Therefore, demonstrating a tangible result of their work if their goals are successful.

Set Attainable Goals

At the start, employees need to have a voice in establishing their goal, since they are ultimately responsible for reaching them. Ask your employee to draft goals that they believe directly contribute to the overall business plan. Once the suggested goals are established, discuss whether they are both realistic and attainable for the employee, flesh them out until you are both happy with the goals and their likability of success. Be careful, however, as your employees are likely to become disengaged if you insist on goals that are too challenging to accomplish. Try not to aim for easy goals either. Instead, focus on goals that create a lot of momentum and energy in your employees, and that will boost morale and productivity.

Design a Success Plan

Once goals are set, ask your employee to explain how they plan to meet these. Have them break goals down into tasks and set interim objectives, especially if it’s a substantial or long-term project. Ask your employee: what are the appropriate milestones? What are the possible risks, and how do they plan to manage them? Then problem-solve with them on how to go forward and achieve success.

Monitor Progress

Staying in the loop of your employee progress will help head off any problems early on. This is one of the most manageable parts of the process as managers and employees now utilise the benefits of virtual communications. Please don’t wait for review time or the outcome of a project to check in with them. Evaluate both long-term and short-term goals every week. Ask your employee what type of monitoring and feedback would be most valuable to them, particularly if the task is especially challenging.

Very few employees attain their goals without some road bumps along the way but try to build a rapport with employees so that they feel happy coming to you when problems arise. If your employee faces an unexpected obstacle, the goal may need reworking,  however, ask them to bring a possible solution to you so you can give them advice. Though if their efforts to solve the problem fails, you will need to get further involved.

There will be times, even with the most reliable support, that employees fail to meet their goals. Talk with your employee about what happened and what each of you thinks went wrong. If the issue was within their control, ask them to try again to implement any solutions you’ve discussed. If it was beyond their control or the goal was too lofty, acknowledge the error but don’t dwell on it.

If you’ve been considering switching to a new payroll solution but hesitated because of the current pandemic, now is the time to get the process underway even if it is just expressing an interest with some potential providers. Whether you’re interested in switching payroll solutions ASAP, or you’re only keeping your options open, these three points are essential to consider beforehand.

Cloud-Based

Companies should realise that now more than ever, a digital working environment requires cloud-based capabilities– even in payroll. Aside from the obvious benefits at the moment, payroll data is stored in the cloud, so your payroll can be accessed from any time, anywhere. This enables Remote Payroll Teams and promotes team collaboration so that payroll can still be processed even if the office is shut down. Other such benefits include security and disaster recovery.

Integration

Too often, payroll solutions do not have the level of integration needed to tie in with the rest of the business, so there is no comprehensive overview of management to work from.   HR often needs to be considered when it comes the all-over control of a Payroll – in essence; the systems should speak to one and other, along with your financials and time and attendance solutions. A payroll solution that can integrate allows management to focus on their roles while their IT solutions can take care of much of the traditional administration-heavy tasks. This can provide real-time business intelligence that can highlight insights into things like remuneration and employee costs, attendance and sick leave, expenses, overtime, and even manager feedback on the value of the employee. This integrated approach improves turn-around time on queries and provides a more transparent way of reporting any HR and payroll related concerns and issues.

Configurable

Perhaps even more important than anything is the need to have a highly configurable and scalable payroll solution for your business. This means that it is not the business that needs to fit into the solution but the reverse. Every payroll is different and has its own set of challenges. Why then should a solution attempt to offer a one-size-fits-all approach? Instead, being configurable means that businesses have all the benefits of a bespoke system without the costs, as well as the assurance that the payroll solution can grow as the company does in the future.

So, as we come to grips with this ‘new normal’, its time to reignite your business and your payroll with a new and adaptable payroll solution.

Can it be June already? What a quick few months that was. It has been a particularly busy time for those working in payroll so we have compiled a useful guide for tax deadlines dates in Ireland and the UK this June.

HMRC (UK) 

1 June 2020 – New Advisory Fuel Rates (AFR) for company car users. Due date for payment of Corporation Tax for period ended 31 August 2019.

7 June 2020 – Deadline for VAT returns and payment Accounting Quarter period ending 30 April 2020 if filed online.

14 June 2020 – Due date for Corporation Tax quarterly instalment for “very large” companies with year end 31 March 2021.

19 June 2020 – Monthly deadline for postal payments of CIS, NICs and PAYE to HMRC.

22 June 2020 – Monthly deadline for electronic remittance of CIS, NICs and PAYE to HMRC.

30 June 2020 – CT61 quarterly period ends.

Revenue (Ireland)

14 June 2020 – PAYE/Pay Related Social Insurance (PRSI)/Universal Social Charge (USC)/Local Property Tax (LPT): Monthly return and payment for May 2020 (payment date is extended to 23rd for ROS users who file and pay online). Dividend Withholding Tax (DWT): Return and payment of DWT for May 2020.Professional Services Withholding Tax (PSWT): F30 monthly return and payment for May 2020.

19 June 2020 – Value-Added Tax (VAT): Monthly VAT 3 return and payment (if due) for the period May together with a Return of Trading Details where the VAT accounting period ends in May.VAT: Annual VAT 3 return and payment (if due) for the period June – May together with a Return of Trading Details where the VAT accounting period ends in May.

1-23 June 2020 – Corporation Tax: PT for APs ending between 1-31 July 2020. Corporation Tax: Returns for APs ending between 1-30 September 2019. Corporation Tax: Pay balance due on APs ending between 1-30 September 2019.

23 June 2020 – Relevant Contracts Tax (RCT): RCT monthly return and payment (if due) for May 2020.

1-30 June 2020 – Corporation Tax: Returns of Third Party Information for APs ending between 1-30 September 2019.

Where the return and payments are not received electronically, the return and payments filing date is 1-21 of the relevant months.

All information on dates is sourced directly from Revenue Ireland’s and HRMC’s websites and published by Intelligo for informative purposes only. For more details or with any queries on these dates, please contact these bodies directly.

With ground-breaking HR technology solutions emerging onto the market, there is now a tech boom that is changing HR as we know it. Be it mobile apps or self-service modules, the development of HR Technology is a trend that shows no signs of stopping, especially considering the current COVID-19 pandemic. Technology is changing the way HR departments operate; from how they contact or engage with employees right through to analysing employee performance. Here are three ways technology is changing HR as we know  it;

  1. Compliance will be sustainable 

Sustainably remaining compliant has often been a significant challenge for HR departments but now, more than ever before is critical. Laws and regulations are continually changing and usually require vast amounts of paperwork and information – even before GDPR came into play. Compliance once required organisation and dedicated IT storage capacity, but cloud-based solutions have streamlined this process. As technologies continue to improve and laws progress, businesses will frequently turn to technology to navigate these complex compliance issues.

  1. Analytics will drive better performance management

Performance management has long been a critical HR function. HR specialists have driven the process, observing the performance of the workforce and facilitating employee reviews. Technology has streamlined the process and discharged a lot of unnecessary steps, but the next data-driven phase of performance management is here with the speedy and widespread adoption of people analytics that helps managers and executives make decisions about their employees.

The data pulled from analytics in HR Tech can be used to create actionable insights and conclusively support data-driven decisions from advancements or remuneration to development and succession planning. Analysing this data also helps HR to identify opportunities for employees to benchmark their performance going forward.

  1. A strategic position for HR

Technology has given HR professionals tools to decrease the time they spend on daily administrative tasks, allowing them to concentrate on issues that need more hands-on attention or strategic issues. Before mobile apps and cloud computing, HR was marked by piles of paperwork and a continuous struggle to keep up with hiring and collections of employee information.

By simplifying responsibilities like recruitment, record keeping and payroll, technology has significantly enhanced productivity and efficiency. HR’s role as an administrative role will continue to shift to HR being a strategic advantage for a company, as the department continues to be aided by technology that simplifies administrative tasks and frees up time and resources to make a more crucial impact on the company.

If businesses have learned anything since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, its the flexibility and necessity of technology to get their businesses and their workforce through this as unscathed as possible. So not only is new tech changing HR as we know it, it’s changing as we need it.